No job is too small for SAS Ltd

Rope Access isn’t just about the big team multi-week projects. No job is too small for SAS Ltd, and sometimes the cost benefits offered by rope access really become obvious on the smaller, emergency projects.

SAS Ltd work with Cargill, the American Grain giant who have several sites at various locations in the Liverpool Docks area. Cargill operate an in-company safety scheme whereby employees are encouraged, and indeed rewarded, for immediately reporting behaviour or issues that are dangerous. Last week one such incident report had Cargill reaching for the telephone to call in SAS Ltd.

An employee had noticed that an ancient air intake on the side of a large grain terminal had a rusted length of iron bar hanging off it at an alarming angle. This clearly presented a serious dropped object hazard made worse by the fact that the danger sat about 30m above ground level and directly above a busy entrance to the building. Like Damocles’ sword this rusted iron bar sat poised above personnel walking in and out of the building through the entrance below.

The location of this problem, deep within the grain terminal complex and very close to the harbour wall, made it impractical to bring in MEWPS of a sufficient size to reach the required height. Scaffolding up to it would have cost a fortune and taken time to build and strike. Rope Access was the obvious answer.

SAS LTD received an emergency call on the Tuesday morning. By lunchtime they had walked the job and come up with a plan to deal with the problem. By 7 o clock that evening the rope access team were packing up and ready to quit Cargill’s site; the dangerous iron bar having been safely removed to ground level and an impromptu inspection of the rest of the vent having been conducted. The Site Superintendent watched the whole process, from a safe distance outside the temporary exclusion zone of course!

This job was only small but resulted in a very happy client and much back slapping after the event. Cargill’s Seaforth Depot was kept running safely and with minimum disruption to operations and personnel on the plant.



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